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Orange County congressional race between Rohrabacher and Rouda a dead heat, new poll finds

Orange County congressional race between Rohrabacher and Rouda a dead heat, new poll finds The nonpartisan survey has compiled one of the country’s best records for accuracy in recent years. Rohrabacher draws his strongest support from conservatives, fellow Republicans and white voters who did not graduate from college, a group that makes up just under one-third of the electorate, the poll found. Whites without college degrees favored Rohrabacher 55% to 34%, with 11% undecided. Rouda gets his biggest backing from women, voters younger than 50 and non-whites, who make up about one-third of the electorate in the district, according to the poll. But minority voters also showed somewhat less interest in the election than did whites, noted Patrick Murray, the director of the Monmouth poll. Just over half the nonwhite voters in the poll said they were following the congressional race “not too closely at all,” compared with 42% of whites without college degrees and 32% of whites who graduated from college. “A key for Rouda is motivating this part of his base,” Murray said of the nonwhite voters surveyed. About 35% of voters in the 48th Congressional District, which runs along the Orange County coast, are whites with a college degree. They divide evenly between the two candidates, the poll found.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-rohrabacher-rouda-poll-20180717-story.html

“Given the White House situation, at this time and place a senator with her experience is the right choice for California,” said Carolyn Fowler of Inglewood, a vice chair of the state party’s Women’s Caucus and Feinstein backer. Donations from candidate’s father fueled high-spending race for California’s No. 2 position » De León’s campaign has focused on the party’s energized liberal faction. He supports single-payer healthcare, aggressive goals for renewable energy and helped lead the successful effort to raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour. He has criticized Feinstein, known for having moderate tendencies, for being too conciliatory toward Trump, such as when she urged people to have “patience” with the president last year. On Friday night, De León hosted an “ABOLISH ICE CREAM SOCIAL” for delegates, a nod toward the Democratic-led effort to abolish the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency after its agents separated thousands of children from their parents after they crossed the border. One of De León’s supporters, Contra Costa Democratic Party secretary Diddo Clark, said California needs new, younger blood in the Senate. Clark argued that some of Feinstein’s most impressive accomplishments happened during her first years in the Senate when she wrote the now-expired assault weapon ban in 1994 and legislation that same year that created the Death Valley and Joshua Tree national parks. Clark also thinks that Feinstein, a former San Francisco mayor, has become so embedded in Washington that she’s lost touch with Californians. “Feinstein lives in an adjacent county, and I have not seen her in my county in this millennia,” Clark said.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-senate-feinstein-de-leon-endorsement-20180714-story.html

Among its 11 provisions, it describes Israel as “the national home of the Jewish people” and says the right to exercise national self-determination there is “unique to the Jewish people”. It also reiterates the status of Jerusalem under Israeli law, which defines the city – part of which is claimed by the Palestinians as the capital of a future state – as the “complete and united… capital of Israel”. Image caption Israeli Arabs have long complained of discrimination Controversially, the law singles out Hebrew as the “state’s language”, effectively prioritising it above Arabic which has for decades been recognised as an official language alongside Hebrew. Israel’s Arab soldiers who fight for the Jewish state It ascribes Arabic “special status” and says its standing before the law came into effect will not be harmed. In one of its clauses, the law stresses the importance of “development of Jewish settlement as a national value”, though it is unclear whether this also alludes to settlement in the Israeli-occupied West Bank. The question of Israel’s status as a Jewish state is politically controversial and has long been debated. Before now, it has not been enshrined in law. Some Israeli Jewish politicians consider that the founding principles of Israel’s creation, as a state for Jews in their ancient homeland, are under threat and could become less relevant, or obsolete, in the future. Image caption Benjamin Netanyahu says the Palestinians must recognise Israel as a Jewish state Fears over the high birth-rate of Israeli Arabs, as well as possible alternatives to a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict which could challenge Israel’s Jewish majority, have spurred on calls to anchor the Jewishness of Israel in law. What are alternatives to a two-state solution?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-44881554

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